Intentional Features of Consciousness in Phenomenology and Shingon Buddhism

  • Angelique Coralie Kendall

Abstract

Fundamental commitments in Western Phenomenology rest on the assumption that subjectivity and intentionality are unassailable features of conscious experience. The dyadic, subject-object structure of experience that results, is thus a necessary condition for conscious awareness. In sharp contrast, Buddhist thought emphasises the fundamental error of subjective and intentional modes of awareness, emphasising instead non-dyadic conscious states. In the Japanese Shingon Buddhist philosophy of Kūkai, such non-dyadic awareness is metaphysically construed as the ontological horizon of the field of consciousness-as-such, interpenetrating all phenomena. The embodied state is highlighted as the means through which such awareness is realised. This paper explores these two perspectives with two questions in mind: how can an enlightened person experience non-dyadic states, and how can they act in the world without subjective agency?
Published
2017-09-09
How to Cite
KENDALL, Angelique Coralie. Intentional Features of Consciousness in Phenomenology and Shingon Buddhism. Simon Fraser University Undergraduate Journal of Philosophy, [S.l.], v. 1, n. 1, p. 1 - 13, sep. 2017. Available at: <https://journals.lib.sfu.ca/index.php/sfu-ujp/article/view/116>. Date accessed: 19 sep. 2017.
Section
Articles

Keywords

Embodiment; Phenomenology; Intentionality; Buddhist Philosophy,;Kūkai